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Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

May 14, 2010

in bento,non bento,studio ghibli

We went to the bed around 3:00AM the night before, and we woke up late this day. We were already very behind on our schedule but since it was mother’s day, I started getting ready for a long day while my boyfriend skyped his mom. (I emailed my mom, by the way.)

Day 2 of Ghibli feast

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

I don’t think I have to write about what Laputa: Castle in the Sky is about but for those poor souls who have never watched the film… A girl named Sheeta has a magical stone that was passed down in her family. She gets kidnapped by Muska, who tries to get the stone to find Laputa, the floating castle in the sky believed to have existed long time ago. Sheeta meets a boy named Pazu, who believes in the existence of Laputa, and they both set out to find Laputa.

When the men from government visit Pazu’s house, looking for Sheeta, he quickly packs breakfast in his bag and escapes his house with Sheeta. After they escape into a mine, they decide to have breakfast.

[Slice of bread with fried egg] (a.k.a Laputa bread)

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

This is probably the most famous food in anime/cartoon of all time in Japan. Maybe because of its simplicity or the way they eat it, but every anime fan tries making it, or dreams of eating it. Actually, I’ve made this before. But I didn’t do any research and just made it from my memory. For some reason, I thought there was a ham on it… It wasn’t accurate Laputa bread, so I decided to do it right this time.

Pazu cooks an egg at home, and stuffs it in his bag. The edge of egg white looks crispy, and the yolk seems pretty well cooked. I heated up the oil in a pan well and cracked an egg in. Once the edge of egg white started to sizzle, I lowered the heat and put a cover on it, and let the yolk cook.

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

It's been a while since I made a fried egg.

The bread Pazu takes out from his bag is pretty thick. A lot thicker than the bread you get from a supermarket. So I got an unsliced loaf of bread at a Japanese bakery that’s in New York City. Of course, it didn’t have to be Japanese bread, but I love how it’s super soft and moist inside even after it’s toasted. The bread in the film is square, just like a Japanese bread, so I thought Japanese bread was more suitable for this. Also it has a hint of sweetness, so I thought it’d be great eat it with just an egg.

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

Firm on the outside, moist and soft on the inside.

I sliced the bread about 1 inch thick, and cut the egg into half. Well, if you look closely, it’s actually not half. One side is bigger than the other, and Pazu gives the bigger side to Sheeta. Isn’t he sweet?

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

Egg too small? Bread too big? T_T

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

A small green apple completes the Laputa bread.

Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

Now all I need is a knife, an oil lamp and a Laputa stone!

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Ghibli feast #3: Laputa, Castle in the Sky

How does Miyazaki make the simplest food looks so good!?

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We didn’t put anything on it, but the “Laputa bread” was surprisingly delicious! It was crispy on the outside, but super fluffy inside. Okay, so it wasn’t exactly a “dish” but we couldn’t not make Laputa bread for our Ghibli feast. Someday we might do the feast that Dola and her band of sky pirates have (at Pazu’s house and on their airship).

The next feast included probably the most challenging dish in this Ghibli feast, Kiki’s Delivery Service…

You can also see these pictures in Ghibi feast set on my flickr page!

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{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

hermanNo Gravatar May 15, 2010 at 2:08 pm

Very very nice! Laputa is my #1 all time fav anime and I remember every single moment in it very clearly. The egg/bread you’ve made looks just like the original. This made my day! Can’t wait to see Kiki’s Delivery ones, wonder what you’re going to make. Maybe the bread that looks like the witch on a broom, or maybe something else!

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JustinNo Gravatar May 15, 2010 at 4:45 pm

I love your ghibli feast !!! looks so tasty !!!

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MarooNo Gravatar May 16, 2010 at 2:40 am

Simple breakfast and yet, perfect! :)

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bennyNo Gravatar May 16, 2010 at 4:30 am

True minimalizm! And a great idea to get inspiration for dishes.

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GabrielaNo Gravatar January 18, 2011 at 3:30 pm

Hello Anna!
Congrats again on such a wonderful blog! (I discovered it today BTW).
I was wondering what Japanese bread is exactly like. I am well into my bread and love researching about it but I’d never heard about Japanese bread until now. What makes it so distinctive?

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AnnaTheRedNo Gravatar January 28, 2011 at 2:35 pm

Gabriela
Again, sorry for the late reply! Japanese bread is super soft, fluffy, moist, doughy and a bit sweeter than regular American bread. You can have them slice a loaf of bread at a bakery but it’s usually sliced very thick. (about 1-inch) The ear of a loaf is also pretty thick. When you toast a slice of it, the outside is crunchy and inside is very fluffy and soooo moist! Just writing this makes me want to go get a loaf of Japanese bread… :P

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Project Maki NYCNo Gravatar January 10, 2012 at 7:14 am

I love your Ghiburi feast series. A simple meal like a toast and egg adds great essence to the movie. You did a fantastic job of re-creating it :) BTW, I blog about vegetarian bento box. Please visit it when you are bored.

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KettukNo Gravatar March 4, 2013 at 7:58 am

Actualy the slices of bread are in fact way ticker than in europe.

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KawenaNo Gravatar October 4, 2013 at 9:40 pm

I love this movie and all of its delicious food! Great job on this simple meal ;) btw do you have any idea what they were eating on the airship (the meal Sheeta made)?

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